A new review in the journal Urology found that strengthening a man's pelvic floor—the muscles that surround the base of your penis and form a shelf across the bottom of your pelvis—can help diminish erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. How so? When you get hard, your pelvic muscles keep blood in your shaft. This helps to enhance and maintain your rigidity, says urological surgeon Andrew Siegel, M.D., the study's author and creator of pelvic floor exercise DVD Private Gym. And for premature ejaculators, squeezing those muscles can delay your orgasm. The stronger these muscles, the better the effect, Dr. Siegel says. 
Lengthening the penis. The most common procedure is to cut the ligament that connects the penis to the pelvic bone. This allows a little more of the shaft -- on average less than an inch -- to become visible outside the body. It's not really lengthening the penis so much as revealing more of what's usually hidden. To prevent the ligament from reattaching, a guy would need weights or stretching devices daily for about six months.
If you think that your penis is too small, be sure to measure it accurately. Even if it is shorter than average, it's important to place the size of your penis in context and ask yourself why it is causing you such distress. It sometimes helps to speak with a psychologist who can help you sort through your feelings and provide the perspective you need.
The side effects of lengthening surgeries are numerous and include infections, nerve damage, reduced sensitivity, and difficulty getting an erection. Perhaps most disturbing, scarring can leave you with a penis that's shorter than what you started with. Widening the penis is even more controversial. Side effects can be unsightly -- a lumpy, bumpy, uneven penis.
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