It seems every guy either wants to tell you how huge his penis is, or make it bigger than it is. And there are lots of methods out there that claim to be able to help. From drugs and supplements to devices and injections and even surgery, there’s lots of options to make your penis grow. But do they actually work, and are they something you want or need to get involved in?
Dermal fat grafting (DFG) involves the extraction of a patch of skin from the patient's own body (usually the lower back, lower abdomen, or buttocks) along with a layer of fat. After the skin is removed from the penis, the extracted tissue is grafted in its place. Because the extracted skin is thicker, it will increase the circumference of the penis. By taking tissue from the patient's own body, the risk of rejection is low.

Penis pumps and vacuums are popularly used as sexual aids to promote erections in men. They are also used by some with the intent of increasing penis size. These devices are placed over the penis (and sometimes the scrotum) and use suction to engorge the penis with blood. If used consistently over a long period of time, they can cause the skin of the penis to become "spongy" and have a thicker appearance.

Lose belly fat. Your penis may look smaller than it really is if it's partially obscured by skin that droops over the top. Losing belly fat is no simple task, but it can make a big difference when it comes to the perceived size of your penis. Start taking measures to lose weight and you'll likely see improvement in other areas as well. According to a report from Harvard, men with a 42-inch waist are 50 percent more likely to have erectile dysfunction (ED) than men with a 32-inch waist.[9]


Stretching with weights. Weights or stretching exercises won't bulk up your penis -- it's not a muscle. But hanging weights off your flaccid penis may stretch it a bit, O'Leary says. The catch is that it requires a freakish degree of dedication. "You might have to wear a weight strapped to your penis eight hours a day for six months," says O'Leary. At the end of it, you could be lucky enough to gain about half an inch. Risks include tearing of the tissue, burst blood vessels, and other problems.
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